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Recycling: It’s Not Automatic

Even Though a Package is Labeled as “Recyclable,” It Doesn’t Mean You Can Just Toss It & Forget It

You’re a consumer goods manufacturer, and you’ve invested time and effort into making sure your product’s packaging is sustainable. For example, perhaps you’ve worked with a packaging supplier to develop a flexible package that can be recycled, and you’ve labeled it as such to let consumers know they can recycle the package. If the consumer doesn’t get this package into the correct recycling stream, there is a chance it may not be recycled at all. Despite your best efforts and those of the consumer, this package could end up in a landfill. So what are we missing?

All Politics (and Recycling!) Are Local

As of today, recycling capabilities vary from one municipality to the next. Items destined for
recycling are commonly put into one container and delivered to these facilities to be sorted and, when possible, recycled. Items not capable of being recycled at one facility are sometimes forwarded on to a secondary facility where the material may be accepted, but just as often this ‘rejected’ material is sent to landfills.

Consumers need some direction as to how to place recyclables into the correct ‘stream’ to ensure recycling takes place. Fortunately there are multiple organizations looking to help companies and consumers route recyclables to the correct stream. One of these is ‘how2recycle.info’. This organization has developed a standardized labeling system to show consumers how to recycle a specific package.

Here’s what a ‘how2recycle.info’ label would look like for our hypothetical flexible packaging container. You can see right up top the label directs consumers to make sure the package is ‘clean and dry’ before recycling. The mid-section of the label indicates ‘store drop-off’ as the preferred way to ensure the package gets to the right facility. The bottom portion of the label provides information on the package type and material composition.

There are multiple ‘how2recycle.info’ graphics available, depending on the package type and the material the package is made from. There are even labels available for packaging with multiple components, like a label or inner
pouch. Companies wishing to have the graphics applied to their packaging
must apply for membership with ‘how2recycle.info’ and then submit packaging to the organization for evaluation of recyclability. Visit their web site to learn more.

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Even Though a Package is Labeled as “Recyclable,” It Doesn’t Mean You Can Just Toss It & Forget It

You’re a consumer goods manufacturer, and you’ve invested time and effort into making sure your product’s packaging is sustainable. For example, perhaps you’ve worked with a packaging supplier to develop a flexible package that can be recycled, and you’ve labeled it as such to let consumers know they can recycle the package. If the consumer doesn’t get this package into the correct recycling stream, there is a chance it may not be recycled at all. Despite your best efforts and those of the consumer, this package could end up in a landfill. So what are we missing?

All Politics (and Recycling!) Are Local

As of today, recycling capabilities vary from one municipality to the next. Items destined for
recycling are commonly put into one container and delivered to these facilities to be sorted and, when possible, recycled. Items not capable of being recycled at one facility are sometimes forwarded on to a secondary facility where the material may be accepted, but just as often this ‘rejected’ material is sent to landfills.

Consumers need some direction as to how to place recyclables into the correct ‘stream’ to ensure recycling takes place. Fortunately there are multiple organizations looking to help companies and consumers route recyclables to the correct stream. One of these is ‘how2recycle.info’. This organization has developed a standardized labeling system to show consumers how to recycle a specific package.

Here’s what a ‘how2recycle.info’ label would look like for our hypothetical flexible packaging container. You can see right up top the label directs consumers to make sure the package is ‘clean and dry’ before recycling. The mid-section of the label indicates ‘store drop-off’ as the preferred way to ensure the package gets to the right facility. The bottom portion of the label provides information on the package type and material composition.

There are multiple ‘how2recycle.info’ graphics available, depending on the package type and the material the package is made from. There are even labels available for packaging with multiple components, like a label or inner
pouch. Companies wishing to have the graphics applied to their packaging
must apply for membership with ‘how2recycle.info’ and then submit packaging to the organization for evaluation of recyclability. Visit their web site to learn more.